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VLA Announcements: Conference and Leadership, July 20, 2020

The Virginia Library Association Annual Conference will not be taking place in person this year. In August 2020, the VLA Executive Committee and 2020 Conference Committee will announce our Fall learning plans for the organization.

Last week, we let you know that our 2021 VLA President, Joslyn Bowling Dixon, was leaving VA for a position as Director of Newark Public Library in New Jersey. The Executive Committee met virtually last week to discuss the 2021 leadership year. Jennifer Resor-Whicker (Radford University) who is the 2020 VLA President, has graciously offered to act as President for 2021. This extra commitment to VLA on Jennifer’s part assures consistent leadership for the organization.  This will also give Jennifer the chance to preside over an in-person conference in Richmond in 2021. In 2021, Jennifer will act as both President and Past President of VLA. If the Executive Committee needs to vote on anything during that time, Past President Jessica Scalph will be called in as a tiebreaker.

VLA Elections (which will determine our 2021 President-Elect and Secretary), will open on August 3 and will close on September 16. We encourage you to visit https://www.vla.org/2021-vla-election-of-officers--candidate-statements-and-biographies to learn more about our candidates, and then log in to your VLA account to make sure you know your password (it will make voting easier for you in just a couple of weeks.)

If your session proposal was accepted by our conference committee, we will be in touch in the coming weeks to provide alternatives to you. Our conference this year may not look like it has in the past, but we are committed to providing learning experiences for librarians and library staff in Virginia.

We are losing many opportunities by not having our in-person conference this year, and want to find ways for you to all continue to network; we want to honor our authors whose books were given awards by VLA this year, and to celebrate our VLA Scholarship and Award recipients. These are all part of our considerations as we move forward.

We ask you to mark your calendars in advance for October 27-29, 2021 in Richmond.

Stay safe, stay healthy, and thank you for serving your communities. Your work matters.

As always, please let me know if you have any questions.
Lisa R. Varga, MLS
Executive Director
Virginia Library Association
[email protected]
 

VLA Zoomversation Chat Record of reading, watching, and listening suggestions: (as of June 2020)

Online Resources:

LibGuides

Videos to watch:

Hampton Public Library Facebook posts with resources:

 VA Library Resources

Podcasts to subscribe to:

  • 1619 (New York Times)
  • About Race
  • Code Switch (NPR)
  • Intersectionality Matters! hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw
  • Momentum: A Race Forward Podcast
  • Pod For The Cause (from The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights)
  • Pod Save the People (Crooked Media)
  • The Combahee River Collective Statement

 

Books to read:

  • Black Feminist Thought by Patricia Hill Collins
  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
  • Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Dr. Brittney Cooper
  • The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
  • Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon
  • How To Be An Antiracist by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
  • Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson (including YA version)
  • Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Saad
  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
  • The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century by Grace Lee Boggs
  • Redefining Realness by Janet Mock
  • Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde
  • So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds (YA version also available)
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color by Cherríe Moraga
  • The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson
  • When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America by Ira Katznelson
  • White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo, PhD
  • White Rage by Carol Anderson

Films and TV series to watch:

  • 13th (Ava DuVernay) — Netflix
  • American Son (Kenny Leon) — Netflix
  • Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975 — Available to rent
  • Clemency (Chinonye Chukwu) — Available to rent
  • Dear White People (Justin Simien) — Netflix
  • Fruitvale Station (Ryan Coogler) — Available to rent
  • I Am Not Your Negro (James Baldwin doc) — Available to rent or on Kanopy
  • If Beale Street Could Talk (Barry Jenkins) — Hulu
  • Just Mercy (Destin Daniel Cretton) — Available to rent
  • King In The Wilderness — HBO
  • See You Yesterday (Stefon Bristol) — Netflix
  • Selma (Ava DuVernay) — Available to rent
  • The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution — Available to rent
  • The Hate U Give (George Tillman Jr.) — Hulu with Cinemax
  • When They See Us (Ava DuVernay) — Netflix

Resources for children:

  • Books for children and young adults from the list of Coretta Scott King Book Award Winners
  • Listen to the Parenting Forward podcast episode ‘Five Pandemic Parenting Lessons with Cindy Wang Brandt’
  • Listen to the Fare of the Free Child podcast
  • Read PBS’s Teaching Your Child About Black History Month
  • Follow The Conscious Kid on Instagram

Organizations to follow on social media:

  • Antiracism Center: Twitter
  • Audre Lorde Project: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Black Women’s Blueprint: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Color Of Change: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Colorlines: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • The Conscious Kid: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Equal Justice Initiative (EJI): Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Families Belong Together: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • MPowerChange: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Muslim Girl: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • NAACP: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • National Domestic Workers Alliance: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • RAICES: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ): Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • SisterSong: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
  • United We Dream: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

Public Library related training:

Compassion/Empathy in customer service and leadership: 

 

 

VLACRL Spring Program 2020 Poster

Delay, Distract, Defer: The Saboteur in the Academic Library

August 5, 2020

10:30 am – 1:30pm; FREE Virtual Program

This program will not be recorded.

 

Registration is now closed

There is no registration cost for this program. Links to join the virtual program will be sent after registration is closed.  

 

 

 

Program:

10:30am: Keynote

“Delay, Distract, Defer: The Saboteur in the Academic Library.”  

  Presented by Erin Pappas and Katie Dohe

12:00 Lunch Break

12:45pm: Afternoon Session

“Challenging the ‘Good Fit’ Narrative: Creating Inclusive recruitment Practices in Academic Libraries.”

  Presented by Jennifer Stout and Samantha Guss

 

Program Description:

Delay, Distract, Defer: Sabotage in the Academic Library

Erin Pappas and Kate Dohe

In 1944, the US Office of Strategic Services released the Simple Sabotage Field Manual. Originally intended to aid the WWII-era citizen saboteur in committing small, undetectable acts of sabotage within an enemy organization, the Field Manual developed a second life on social media after its declassification, as its advice to “make faulty decisions, to adopt an uncooperative attitude, and to induce others to follow suit” echoed the pitfalls of modern office work. Higher education’s hierarchical culture meets professional norms that stress collaborative decision-making and emotional labor in academic libraries, and create an environment ripe for exploitation by those unhappy with the direction of an organization. As workers charged with the stewardship of information infrastructure, and as individuals who create and implement best practices in digital cultural heritage systems, library saboteurs have the potential to derail and impede the fundamental mission of the organization, but also to save it from toxic leadership and mismanagement. In this interactive session, we invite attendees to consider the motives and methods of saboteurs, the power dynamics that underpin sabotage, and how to navigate a sabotaged library—even if the saboteur is you.

Challenging the ‘Good Fit’ Narrative: Creating Inclusive Recruitment Practices in Academic Libraries 

Jennifer Stout and Samantha Guss

As a profession, we talk the talk of valuing diversity and inclusion, but do we walk the walk with our hiring practices? The profession stresses the importance of “a good fit” when hiring, but we rarely interrogate the fact that “a good fit” can be a reflection of our implicit biases. Three academic librarians conducted a survey of hiring policies with a focus on the processes (or lack thereof) of recruiting candidates from underrepresented groups. This session will report on their findings and recommend the implementation of specific practices designed to create an inclusive candidate pool and an equitable search process.

More information about our speakers:

 Erin Pappas is the Research Librarian for various humanities departments at the University of Virginia. She is the co-editor of the recently published #DLFTeach Toolkit: Lesson Plans for Digital Library Instruction, and for a forthcoming volume on the decolonization of area studies from Library Juice Press.

 Kate Dohe is the Manager of the Digital Programs & Initiatives department in the University of Maryland Libraries. Kate’s team oversees day-to-day activities related to digital repository management, digital preservation, research data services, and electronic publishing. Select publications include “Care, Code, and Digital Libraries: Embracing Critical Practice in Digital Library Communities” (In the Library with the Lead Pipe), and “Linked Data, Unlinked Communities” (Lady Science).

Samantha Guss - Social Sciences Librarian, University of Richmond

Jennifer Stout - Teaching & Learning Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

 

2020 Scholarship Winners Announced

The VLA Scholarship Committee is pleased to announce the 2020 scholarship recipients. Congratulations to Sonya Coleman, Amanda Lawson, and Sinead Tanner on their academic excellence and dedication to the field of Library Science. Sonya, Amanda and Sinead have each received $2500 from VLA to help with costs associated with their academic programs. All three will be honored at the Annual Awards and Scholarship Banquet at the VLA Conference in Norfolk in October.

Sonya Coleman

Sonya Coleman has worked at the Library of Virginia since 2011, currently as the Digital Engagement and Social Media Coordinator. Sonya has created innovative ways to involve volunteers and young people in transcribing historical documents. Sonya has been active in community volunteer work as well as holding committee positions in the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives organization, and the Visual Resources Association. She says, “I’m very passionate about exposing content in a highly accessible and searchable way.” Sonya has been a member of VLA since 2018 and is earning her MLIS in Digital Libraries from Kent State University. She will graduate in spring of 2021.

 

Amanda Lawson

The 2020 recipient of the Clara Stanley VLA Paraprofessional Forum Scholarship is Amanda Lawson from Pulaski, VA. Amanda works as a Monographics Specialist in the Collection & Technical Services Department at Radford University’s McConnell Library. She is active in her community and in her free time by volunteering with the Montgomery County Christmas Store and her daughter’s preschool. She participates in a number of professional committees including the Library Display Committee, Faculty Outreach Committee, World War II 75th Anniversary Commemorative Series Committee, and Radford University Staff Senate where she serves as an alternate senator.  Amanda has an outstanding background, including graduating with a 4.0 with her Bachelor’s degree and increasing her responsibilities in her position over the past nine years. She says, “I see library science as an immeasurable pasture of information and librarians as shepherds for those seeking such information.” Amanda joined VLA in 2019. She is obtaining her MSIS degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and will graduate in Spring of 2023. 

 

Sinead Tanner 

Sinead Tanner has worked as a Library Assistant at Gordonsville Branch Library since 2012. In her position, she has initiated an outreach program of “take and make” crafts, for patrons not able to stay at the library for programs. She says, “I try every day to share the magic of the library with other children as my librarians shared it with me.” Sinead joined VLA in 2020 and is enrolled in the MLIS program through Valdosta State University with an expected graduate date of May 2022.

 

VLA has been providing scholarships to students pursuing their Master's Degrees in Library and Information Sciences for nearly 30 years. Support this program with a tax-deductible donation today!

 

VLA New Members Round Table: Mentoring Program 2020

The VLA New Members Round Table is pleased to offer another year of mentoring for VLA members! We welcome interest from both potential mentees and mentors. If you are interested, please complete the following form and we will be in touch in the next few weeks. The deadline for signing up is Wednesday, April 1

Link to sign up: https://forms.gle/Ys5A4s2eB5SsFMwEA

The VLA NMRT Mentoring Program is designed to help new VLA members grow professionally through partnerships with seasoned VLA members. The program is open to the following: 

Mentees: Librarians or library staff members in the first five years of their professional career or library school students. See this guide for more details.

Mentors: A career mentor must have been employed in a professional position for at least five years and be willing to correspond with their mentee at least once every two months in whatever manner is most convenient for both parties. See this guide for more details.

A few notes about the program:

  • Membership in VLA is required. Conference attendance is not required.
  • The VLA NMRT Mentoring Program is not intended as a job search program.
  • Mentor/mentee partnerships will officially run from April to October.
  • Mentors and mentees will be partnered based on their similar interests, professional experience or goals, and when able, by their geographic proximity to each other. While face-to-face communication is not required, we hope that mentors and mentees who are near one another take the opportunity to meet in person. 
  • The availability of mentors and mentees and the information provided on the applications will determine the partnerships made.

If you have any questions, please contact John Hood, VLA NMRT Communications and Outreach Director ([email protected]), or Anne Rappe-Epperson, VLA NMRT Chair ([email protected]). 

Thank you, and have a great day!

Sincerely,
NMRT Leadership Team

 
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